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QCTO Code of Conduct for Development Quality Partners (DQP) and Assessment Quality Partners (AQP)

The QCTO Code of Conduct for Development Quality Partners (DQP) and Assessment Quality Partners (AQP) We, the undersigned, wish to be appointed by the QCTO as a DQP/AQP. We agree that, if the QCTO delegates such functions to us, we hereby commit ourselves to abide by the QCTO’s Code of Conduct in relation to all our work. The Code of Conduct to which we agree is as follows: i.      promoting the objectives of the NQF; ii.      dealing   fairly,   professionally   and   equitably   with   stakeholders   whilst accelerating the redress of past unfair discrimination; iii.      consulting  with  all  relevant  stakeholders  that  have  an  interest  in  the development and assessment of occupational qualifica[...]

teacher

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.